Tag Archives: Asia Pacific

The challenge of mobility and the cost of BYOD fleets #Media #Press #ZDNet

In March 2013, ZDNet reported that the size of the 2013 bring-your-own-device (BYOD) market would be double that of 2012, making BYOD truly mainstream.

Sixty eight percent of respondents in the same research report said that getting buy-in from staff presents no challenge to a BYOD workplace program (no surprise, given how much we all love our own phones and tablets), but of the aspects reported as “a very big challenge”, most responses were for “devising a security policy” and “implementing appropriate mobile device management [MDM] software”.

A more recent study by Greyhound research confirms how many enterprise IT departments are getting on board, and also how many seem ill equipped to do so. Seventy percent of respondents have plans for BYOD, but 30 percent of those have no concrete security or policy plans in place.

All of this means that BYOD is here to stay, but is the enterprise world ready for it?

The challenges of BYOD
Before you even talk about malware or the Apple Store, the first hurdle is making BYOD work financially. You have to buy fewer devices, but one little security incident could be catastrophic. According to CompTIA, the top reason given for BYOD is to increase out-of-office productivity, but research by TEKsystems said the main payback is employee satisfaction, with little monetary effect on customers or IT budgets.

Assuming you jump in, the scariest threat is security. The thought of company data on a device that’s dripping with malware is scary enough, but an employee posting “about to take the bag full of cash profits down to the bank — LOL!” on their mobile Facebook app or losing their device (accounting for almost half of all mobile security incidents) might cripple the business just as thoroughly. The 160,000 phones lost across the US every day, according to the CompTIA report, cost the economy $30 billion per year.

“Data classification is a huge focal point of action,” said Australian National University (ANU) CIO Peter Nikoletatos. In an environment where he says users, particularly students, have always bought their own devices, data access and protection levels undergo strict implementation procedures.

“Users have to be informed about the various mobile and cloud solutions, but, more importantly, how to leverage them in a way that minimises risk to our IP and protects both users’ privacy and the university’s reputation.”

But even legitimate data or usage presents a grey area. Usually, it’s easy to determine what belongs to you and your employer (Angry Birds versus a spreadsheet with company finances), but Nerds On Call founder Andrea Eldridge said not everything on your device is so cut and dried.

“Communicating with clients can lead to muddy waters when they begin to call you directly on your mobile,” she said. Once a client calls you, she thinks your employer effectively has some claim to your phone number — but do they have the right to ask you to give it up if you leave?

To sandbox of not
Mobile device management (MDM) is a set of protocols and policies used by IT departments to minimise risks, but if the figures above are to be believed, it’s not as mature or widespread as it should be.

A popular alternative is giving users a cloud-based work environment that’s locked off from the rest of their system. Still in academia, University of Missouri-Columbia assistant professor Prasad Calyam said MDM forces the IT department to accept liability for managing the whole device. “A solution like VMware Horizon Workspace is attractive, because it lets us only manage the assets on the phone for services like virtual classroom labs,” he said.

Of course, some might argue that this flies somewhat in the face of BYOD’s very spirit, because you’re forcing users to use your applications and/or workspace, rather than the ones they want. BYOD, after all, is about the user experience.

But giving your users full access to the tool in question means facing the perilous world of operating systems fragmentation. Several — like Windows Mobile and iOS — are strictly managed, secured, and deployed by their respective owners, but when Android devices overtook the iPhone as Australia’s most popular mobile device last December, it opened it up to a very fractious field.

We can look to coding standards to save us to some extent; they’ve helped Dish Network, one of the biggest satellite TV providers in the US.

“We were excited about a solution that leverages the potential of HTML 5,” said Dish CIO Mike McClaskey. “That means we have a standard application that can run on a lot of different operating systems and devices, and render accurately and consistently.”

Building apps and tools for operating systems also isn’t as much of a problem as we think it is, according to LANDesk director of product Mike Temple. “People think of it as an application development challenge, but there’s a whole industry popping up to outsource application development when the real issue is the management platform,” he said.

But the field is still fraught with technical and policy challenges. ANU’s MDM solution has a remote wipe function, but Peter Nikoletatos said an efficient and secure cloud solution is still being resolved.

The university provides guidelines on data management and responsible use, but, as Nikoletatos said, “as users shift more to mobile devices, real-time access to data anywhere, anytime is becoming an increasing challenge”.

Source: ZDNet

The challenge of mobility and the cost of BYOD fleets #Media #Press #ZDNet

In March 2013, ZDNet reported that the size of the 2013 bring-your-own-device (BYOD) market would be double that of 2012, making BYOD truly mainstream.

Sixty eight percent of respondents in the same research report said that getting buy-in from staff presents no challenge to a BYOD workplace program (no surprise, given how much we all love our own phones and tablets), but of the aspects reported as “a very big challenge”, most responses were for “devising a security policy” and “implementing appropriate mobile device management [MDM] software”.

more recent study by Greyhound research confirms how many enterprise IT departments are getting on board, and also how many seem ill equipped to do so. Seventy percent of respondents have plans for BYOD, but 30 percent of those have no concrete security or policy plans in place.

All of this means that BYOD is here to stay, but is the enterprise world ready for it?

The challenges of BYOD
Before you even talk about malware or the Apple Store, the first hurdle is making BYOD work financially. You have to buy fewer devices, but one little security incident could be catastrophic. According to CompTIA, the top reason given for BYOD is to increase out-of-office productivity, but research by TEKsystems said the main payback is employee satisfaction, with little monetary effect on customers or IT budgets.

Assuming you jump in, the scariest threat is security. The thought of company data on a device that’s dripping with malware is scary enough, but an employee posting “about to take the bag full of cash profits down to the bank — LOL!” on their mobile Facebook app or losing their device (accounting for almost half of all mobile security incidents) might cripple the business just as thoroughly. The 160,000 phones lost across the US every day, according to the CompTIA report, cost the economy $30 billion per year.

“Data classification is a huge focal point of action,” said Australian National University (ANU) CIO Peter Nikoletatos. In an environment where he says users, particularly students, have always bought their own devices, data access and protection levels undergo strict implementation procedures.

“Users have to be informed about the various mobile and cloud solutions, but, more importantly, how to leverage them in a way that minimises risk to our IP and protects both users’ privacy and the university’s reputation.”

But even legitimate data or usage presents a grey area. Usually, it’s easy to determine what belongs to you and your employer (Angry Birds versus a spreadsheet with company finances), but Nerds On Call founder Andrea Eldridge said not everything on your device is so cut and dried.

“Communicating with clients can lead to muddy waters when they begin to call you directly on your mobile,” she said. Once a client calls you, she thinks your employer effectively has some claim to your phone number — but do they have the right to ask you to give it up if you leave?

To sandbox of not
Mobile device management (MDM) is a set of protocols and policies used by IT departments to minimise risks, but if the figures above are to be believed, it’s not as mature or widespread as it should be.

A popular alternative is giving users a cloud-based work environment that’s locked off from the rest of their system. Still in academia, University of Missouri-Columbia assistant professor Prasad Calyam said MDM forces the IT department to accept liability for managing the whole device. “A solution like VMware Horizon Workspace is attractive, because it lets us only manage the assets on the phone for services like virtual classroom labs,” he said.

Of course, some might argue that this flies somewhat in the face of BYOD’s very spirit, because you’re forcing users to use your applications and/or workspace, rather than the ones they want. BYOD, after all, is about the user experience.

But giving your users full access to the tool in question means facing the perilous world of operating systems fragmentation. Several — like Windows Mobile and iOS — are strictly managed, secured, and deployed by their respective owners, but when Android devices overtook the iPhone as Australia’s most popular mobile device last December, it opened it up to a very fractious field.

We can look to coding standards to save us to some extent; they’ve helped Dish Network, one of the biggest satellite TV providers in the US.

“We were excited about a solution that leverages the potential of HTML 5,” said Dish CIO Mike McClaskey. “That means we have a standard application that can run on a lot of different operating systems and devices, and render accurately and consistently.”

Building apps and tools for operating systems also isn’t as much of a problem as we think it is, according to LANDesk director of product Mike Temple. “People think of it as an application development challenge, but there’s a whole industry popping up to outsource application development when the real issue is the management platform,” he said.

But the field is still fraught with technical and policy challenges. ANU’s MDM solution has a remote wipe function, but Peter Nikoletatos said an efficient and secure cloud solution is still being resolved.

The university provides guidelines on data management and responsible use, but, as Nikoletatos said, “as users shift more to mobile devices, real-time access to data anywhere, anytime is becoming an increasing challenge”.

Source: ZDNet

Five Ways for SMBs to Enter Emerging Markets Fast #Media #Press #SMBNow

Growing companies often look to developing markets for new opportunities; however, finding the right time to enter these markets can be a difficult balance. Recent research from Oxford Economics, sponsored by SAP, suggests that less than one-quarter of U.S. small and medium enterprises (SMEs) will be operating solely in the U.S. in three years. While SMEs are expanding their presence at a rapid rate in new markets, BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) are becoming old news: the acronym has been amended by many economists with “S” for South Africa, and lately, “I” for Indonesia. Other countries like Turkey and South Korea are ripe for entry even though they were hardly considered just a few years ago.

Companies must act more quickly on opportunities in emerging markets than in the past. For example, a recent survey by Accenture found that 80 percent of executives say they are focused primarily on high-growth markets in emerging economies, and 73 percent believe their companies must speed up efforts to build market share in these countries – lest they miss out on a crucial window.

Companies need to act quickly, but be mindful of rushing. Besides timing, companies should also keep in mind partnering, hiring, and flexibility in both technology infrastructure and business processes to avoid making mistakes in global expansion. Here are five things SMEs looking to expand should consider:

  • Don’t always be the first to market. Companies need to move aggressively when the time is right, but that does not necessarily mean being a first mover, says Babak Hafezi, CEO of Hafezi Capital, a McLean, Virginia-based management consultancy. First movers often make many mistakes, so a second or third mover has the opportunity to learn from them. Collect best practices and have a solid plan ready to enact once in the market.
  • Use joint ventures for speed. Joint venture partners can gain precious time in the often onerous political and legal processes that foreign companies face by helping them understand cultural differences and establish critical relationships. Having this partnership can help eliminate a lack of local knowledge as a hindrance to growth. For example, by setting up a joint venture with a local Brazilian company, one technology company was in the marketplace within three months, recalls Hafezi.
  • Consider hiring an expat. Hiring local people can work fine, but hiring someone who  is familiar with both the business customs and culture of U.S. and the emerging market is even better. “If you happen to find a Latin American that has worked for the company in the U.S. for a while and wants to go back home, that’s always a great fit because then you get both the advantage of understanding the corporate culture as well as understanding the culture in the emerging market,” says Bryan Pearce, Americas Director with Ernst & Young.
  • Localize your technology strategy. Locals, even IT executives, likely won’t have the same level of technology maturity as employees in the home office, says Sanchit Vir Gogia, founder and Group CEO of Greyhound Knowledge Group, an IT research and advisory firm focused in emerging markets.Ensuring that resources match the skill level of the employees can help reduce the need for additional IT support or wasted resources. In Thailand, a subsidiary started with a mobile app for factory workers so that they could check on inventory status while on the shop floor instead a full-blown desktop app. “A lot of these people are not educated in technology but using a mobile app is very easy for them to learn.”
  • Offer independence. In an emerging market the parent company should try to standardize the core of processes such as financial and hiring, but let subsidiaries put their own wrappers on things. Keeping local companies local is critical to their success in the region. Says Pearce: “What’s more negotiable is how you interface and react with the people at the local level and their customers so that it is relevant and culturally sensitive.”

Source: SMBNow

Five Ways for SMBs to Enter Emerging Markets Fast #Media #Press #SMBNow

Growing companies often look to developing markets for new opportunities; however, finding the right time to enter these markets can be a difficult balance. Recent research from Oxford Economics, sponsored by SAP, suggests that less than one-quarter of U.S. small and medium enterprises (SMEs) will be operating solely in the U.S. in three years. While SMEs are expanding their presence at a rapid rate in new markets, BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) are becoming old news: the acronym has been amended by many economists with “S” for South Africa, and lately, “I” for Indonesia. Other countries like Turkey and South Korea are ripe for entry even though they were hardly considered just a few years ago.

Companies must act more quickly on opportunities in emerging markets than in the past. For example, a recent survey by Accenture found that 80 percent of executives say they are focused primarily on high-growth markets in emerging economies, and 73 percent believe their companies must speed up efforts to build market share in these countries – lest they miss out on a crucial window.

Companies need to act quickly, but be mindful of rushing. Besides timing, companies should also keep in mind partnering, hiring, and flexibility in both technology infrastructure and business processes to avoid making mistakes in global expansion. Here are five things SMEs looking to expand should consider:

  • Don’t always be the first to market. Companies need to move aggressively when the time is right, but that does not necessarily mean being a first mover, says Babak Hafezi, CEO of Hafezi Capital, a McLean, Virginia-based management consultancy. First movers often make many mistakes, so a second or third mover has the opportunity to learn from them. Collect best practices and have a solid plan ready to enact once in the market.
  • Use joint ventures for speed. Joint venture partners can gain precious time in the often onerous political and legal processes that foreign companies face by helping them understand cultural differences and establish critical relationships. Having this partnership can help eliminate a lack of local knowledge as a hindrance to growth. For example, by setting up a joint venture with a local Brazilian company, one technology company was in the marketplace within three months, recalls Hafezi.
  • Consider hiring an expat. Hiring local people can work fine, but hiring someone who  is familiar with both the business customs and culture of U.S. and the emerging market is even better. “If you happen to find a Latin American that has worked for the company in the U.S. for a while and wants to go back home, that’s always a great fit because then you get both the advantage of understanding the corporate culture as well as understanding the culture in the emerging market,” says Bryan Pearce, Americas Director with Ernst & Young.
  • Localize your technology strategy. Locals, even IT executives, likely won’t have the same level of technology maturity as employees in the home office, says Sanchit Vir Gogia, founder and Group CEO of Greyhound Knowledge Group, an IT research and advisory firm focused in emerging markets.Ensuring that resources match the skill level of the employees can help reduce the need for additional IT support or wasted resources. In Thailand, a subsidiary started with a mobile app for factory workers so that they could check on inventory status while on the shop floor instead a full-blown desktop app. “A lot of these people are not educated in technology but using a mobile app is very easy for them to learn.”
  • Offer independence. In an emerging market the parent company should try to standardize the core of processes such as financial and hiring, but let subsidiaries put their own wrappers on things. Keeping local companies local is critical to their success in the region. Says Pearce: “What’s more negotiable is how you interface and react with the people at the local level and their customers so that it is relevant and culturally sensitive.”

Source: SMBNow

Mobile Strategy In Emerging Markets: 10 Tips #Media #Press #TechWeb

Consumers in emerging economies have skipped past stodgy old landlines and PCs straight to mobile phones. But that doesn’t mean CIOs in those regions won’t run into problems with building the mobile enterprise.

“To successfully implement a project compared to the U.S. or U.K. is absolutely different in terms of cultural challenges, maturity mindsets and vendor presence,” said Sanchit Vir Gogia, founder and principal analyst at Greyhound Research in New Delhi.

Greyhound Research recently interviewed nearly 100 CIOs in Asia/Pacific and Africa/Middle East. The resulting report, “Riding the enterprise mobility wave: How are CIOs dealing with it?” finds that companies are investing in mobile, but CIOs face vexing issues.

Here are ten things CIOs should remember when implementing mobile applications in emerging markets:

1. It’s a mobile, mobile, mobile, mobile world. Successful companies understand that mobile phones matter more than PCs or landlines in the developing world. Of the CIOs surveyed, more than 70 percent said they expect to increase their spending on existing applications to mobile phones, and more than 65 percent say they plan to expand — or already are expanding — mobile IT.

2. Mobile is messy. Making applications mobile causes major headaches. Of the CIOs interviewed, 52 percent reported confusion about the best ways to make applications more mobile and securing them, and 32 percent said they face significant challenges making applications work across multiple operating systems and devices.

3. Leapfrogs can also be laggards. Yes, emerging markets have leapfrogged developed countries in some ways, but they lag in others. BYOD is notably less common, for example, because tablets like the iPad have been slow to arrive in many emerging markets. Also, Gogia explained, labor markets are far more fluid than in most developed nations, creating extra challenges for securing data, networks and intellectual property. At the same time, BYOD is gaining a foothold in some emerging markets.

4. Get a bigger scale. Scale presents challenges, especially in China and India. Some factories might employ half a million people. Bringing mobility to that kind of enterprise would present challenges in any environment.

5. Networks can be fickle. Yes, everything’s mobile. But mobile isn’t everywhere. CIOs cannot expect the same consistency of quality and coverage for mobile networks in emerging markets as they see in established ones.

6. Partners aren’t necessarily mature. Mobile expertise is in high demand. But even traditional outsourcers need to develop expertise in emerging markets. Mobile specialists like Mobile Iron are still building their presences as well, Gogia said. CIOs need to do thorough due diligence before signing deals.

7. Start simple. Regional CIOs say e-mail and CRM applications are the most common mobile applications, followed by payroll management and business intelligence applications. Cloud-based apps may prove difficult to secure.

8. Grit your teeth. Whether you’re working with local companies or acquiring them, be prepared for legacy applications that are difficult to bring onto mobile phones. “Legacy apps are a problem — many are not mobile-friendly,” said Gogia.

9. Give yourself time. “Transitioning IT to a country like China is not something you can do over a couple of quarters, or maybe even a year or two,” he said.

10. Play mind games. Successful mobile enterprise projects in emerging markets require a different mindset than those in established markets. CIOs must not:

– Presume that it’s business as usual, even for established vendor relationships.

– Expect cultural norms to be similar from one market to another.

– Assume infrastructure will be mature.

Source: TechWeb

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Mobile Strategy In Emerging Markets: 10 Tips #Media #Press #TechWeb

Consumers in emerging economies have skipped past stodgy old landlines and PCs straight to mobile phones. But that doesn’t mean CIOs in those regions won’t run into problems with building the mobile enterprise.

“To successfully implement a project compared to the U.S. or U.K. is absolutely different in terms of cultural challenges, maturity mindsets and vendor presence,” said Sanchit Vir Gogia, founder and principal analyst at Greyhound Research in New Delhi.

Greyhound Research recently interviewed nearly 100 CIOs in Asia/Pacific and Africa/Middle East. The resulting report, “Riding the enterprise mobility wave: How are CIOs dealing with it?” finds that companies are investing in mobile, but CIOs face vexing issues.

Here are ten things CIOs should remember when implementing mobile applications in emerging markets:

1. It’s a mobile, mobile, mobile, mobile world. Successful companies understand that mobile phones matter more than PCs or landlines in the developing world. Of the CIOs surveyed, more than 70 percent said they expect to increase their spending on existing applications to mobile phones, and more than 65 percent say they plan to expand — or already are expanding — mobile IT.

2. Mobile is messy. Making applications mobile causes major headaches. Of the CIOs interviewed, 52 percent reported confusion about the best ways to make applications more mobile and securing them, and 32 percent said they face significant challenges making applications work across multiple operating systems and devices.

3. Leapfrogs can also be laggards. Yes, emerging markets have leapfrogged developed countries in some ways, but they lag in others. BYOD is notably less common, for example, because tablets like the iPad have been slow to arrive in many emerging markets. Also, Gogia explained, labor markets are far more fluid than in most developed nations, creating extra challenges for securing data, networks and intellectual property. At the same time, BYOD is gaining a foothold in some emerging markets.

4. Get a bigger scale. Scale presents challenges, especially in China and India. Some factories might employ half a million people. Bringing mobility to that kind of enterprise would present challenges in any environment.

5. Networks can be fickle. Yes, everything’s mobile. But mobile isn’t everywhere. CIOs cannot expect the same consistency of quality and coverage for mobile networks in emerging markets as they see in established ones.

6. Partners aren’t necessarily mature. Mobile expertise is in high demand. But even traditional outsourcers need to develop expertise in emerging markets. Mobile specialists like Mobile Iron are still building their presences as well, Gogia said. CIOs need to do thorough due diligence before signing deals.

7. Start simple. Regional CIOs say e-mail and CRM applications are the most common mobile applications, followed by payroll management and business intelligence applications. Cloud-based apps may prove difficult to secure.

8. Grit your teeth. Whether you’re working with local companies or acquiring them, be prepared for legacy applications that are difficult to bring onto mobile phones. “Legacy apps are a problem — many are not mobile-friendly,” said Gogia.

9. Give yourself time. “Transitioning IT to a country like China is not something you can do over a couple of quarters, or maybe even a year or two,” he said.

10. Play mind games. Successful mobile enterprise projects in emerging markets require a different mindset than those in established markets. CIOs must not:

– Presume that it’s business as usual, even for established vendor relationships.

– Expect cultural norms to be similar from one market to another.

– Assume infrastructure will be mature.

Source: TechWeb

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10 dicas de estratégia de mobilidade para mercados emergentes #Media #Press #InformationWeek #Brazil

Consumidores em economias emergentes substituíram as velhas linhas fixas e PCs diretamente por telefones móveis. Mas isso não quer dizer que CIOS destas regiões não encontrem problemas ao montar empreendimentos mobile.

“Implementar um projeto de sucesso [em países emergentes] é totalmente diferente em termos de desafios culturais, maturidade de pensamento e presença de vendedores se compararmos aos mesmos procesoss nos Estados Unidos ou no Reino Unido”, pontua o fundador e principal analista da Greyhound Research de Nova Délhi, Sanchit Vir Gogia.

A empresa recentemente entrevistou cerca de 100 CIOs dos mercados Ásia/Pacífico e África/Oriente Médio. O resultado foi a pesquisa “Aproveitando a onda de mobilidade empresarial: Como os CIOs estão cuidando disso?”, que mostra que as empresas estão investindo em mobilidade, enquanto CIOs encaram questões inquietantes.

Aqui estão 10 coisas que os CIOs devem lembrar quando implementarem aplicações de mobilidade em mercados emergentes:

1. É um móvel mundo móvel

Companhia de sucesso entendem que telefones móveis são mais importantes que computadores pessoais ou linhas fixas neste mundo em desenvolvimento. Dos CIOs entrevistados, mais de 70% disseram que estão esperando aumentar os gastos em aplicações já existentes para celulares, e mais de 65% disseram que planejam ou já estão expandindo a TI móvel.

2. Mobilidade é bagunça

Criar aplicações móveis causa grandes dores de cabeça. Dos CIOs entrevistados, 52% reportaram confusão entre as melhores formas de criar aplicações móveis e seguras; e 32% disseram que encaram desafios significativos para fazê-las funcionar em diversos sistemas operacionais e dispositivos.

3. Apressados também podem ser retardatários

Sim, mercados emergentes têm apressado o desenvolvimento de países em alguns pontos, mas eles continuam atrasados em outros.  BYOD é notavelmente menos comum nesses lugares porque tablets, como o iPad por exemplo, demoraram a chegar aos mercados.

4. Obtenha uma escala maior

A escala apresenta alguns desafios, especialmente na China e na Índia. Algumas fábricas empregam meio milhão de pessoas. Esse número muito grande de usuários torna a mobilidade um desafio em qualquer ambiente.

5. Redes podem ser inconstantes

Sim, tudo é mobilidade. Mas mobilidade não está presente em todos os locais. CIOs não podem esperar a mesma qualidade e cobertura de redes móveis de mercados estabelecidos em mercados emergentes.

6. Sócios não são necessariamente maduros

O conhecimento em mobilidade está em alta, mas empresas de outsourcing mais tradicionais precisam desenvolver o experiência em mercados emergentes. Especialistas em mobile como a Mobile Iron ainda estão construindo sua reputação, atesta Gogia. Os CIOs precisam fazer as devidas diligências antes de assinar contratos.

7. Comece simples

CIOs regionais dizem que e-mail e ferramentas de gestão de relacionamento com o cliente (CRM, na sigla em inglês) são as aplicações móveis mais comuns, seguidas por gerenciamento de pagamentos e de business inteligente (BI). Aplicativos baseados na nuvem podem se mostrar difíceis pela questão da segurança.

8. Cerre os dentes

Se você está trabalhando com companhias locais, ou adquirindo-as, esteja preparado para aplicações ultrapassadas, difíceis de serem trazidas para celulares. “Aplicativos ultrapassados são um problema, muitos não são compatíveis com dispositivos móveis”, explica Gogia.

9. Dê tempo ao tempo

“A transição de TI para um país como a China não é algo que pode ser feitos em 6 meses, ou talvez em um ano ou dois”, atesta Gogia.

10. Utilize jogos mentais

Projetos mobile de sucesso em países emergentes demandam mentalidade diferente de mercados estabelecidos. Os CIOs não devem:

- Assumir que é um negócio comum, mesmo para relações estabelecidas com fornecedores.

- Esperar que normas culturais sejam parecidas entre um mercado e outro.

- Acreditar que a infraestrutura estará pronta.

Source: InformationWeek (Brasil)

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